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Archives for October 2011

The Life of a Water Bottle

Are you still using bottled water? This graphic shows what is happening to that bottle when you are done.

via

If you use bottled water please recycle your bottles. Better yet, switch to a reusable water bottle like the options below. (click on the pictures for more info)


Have you made the switch yet?

 


About the Author


Lisa Sharp is passionate about green living, organic food, animals, and natural medicine. She is an environmental activist, green living expert, and consultant. In addition to being the founder and editor of Green Oklahoma, Lisa has a green living blog, Retro Housewife Goes Green. You can follow Lisa on twitter @Retrohousewife5 and Facebook.

 

 

Norman Expands Recycling Program

The City of Norman has added plastics #3-#7, with some exceptions,  to their recycling program. They will now except plastics #1- Beverage bottles, #2- Milk, shampoo and conditioner bottles, detergent and fabric softener bottles, #3-7-Juice, yogurt, dairy, margarine tubs, prescription vials, clean garden pots or flats. Plastics they don’t except include; Styrofoam, plastics that held toxins like oil, antifreeze, paint thinner, or pesticides, plastic bags, plastic wrap, blister packs or bubble wrap, automotive plastics, household or storage containers, hoses, lawn furniture, or coat hangers.

Plastic #3-#7 will be excepted by Norman’s curbside recycling program and at drop-offs. There are three drop-off areas; Hollywood Shopping Center at McGee and Lindsey, Hobby Lobby at 24th Ave. NW and Main St. on the west side of Hobby Lobby and Browns Shoes, and at the Cleveland County Fairgrounds at 1499 N. Porter.

Other items Norman recycling accepts include; aluminum cans, glass containers, paper, steel cans, tin cans, and cardboard (only at drop-off locations). Norman’s recycling rate is currently 47% which is good but they help adding more plastic will increase the recycling rate even more.


For more information on recycling in Norman visit the City of Norman’s website.

 


About the Author


Lisa Sharp is passionate about green living, organic food, animals, and natural medicine. She is an environmental activist, green living expert, and consultant. In addition to being the founder and editor of Green Oklahoma, Lisa has a green living blog, Retro Housewife Goes Green. You can follow Lisa on twitter @Retrohousewife5 and Facebook.

 

 

House Votes to Reduce Regulations for Cement Plants

 

Rep. John Sullivan, of Oklahoma, introduced the Cement Sector Regulatory Relief Act of 2011 (H.R. 2681) in the House yesterday and it just passed 262-161. This bill will exempt cement manufacturing plants from the Clean Air Act. This bill will have a direct effect on many Oklahomans as there are currently three cement plants in the state.


“The House essentially just opened up all the doors and windows in homes across the country and urged polluters to blow their toxic emissions right in. The supporters of H.R. 2681 cast their votes today for more toxic mercury pollution, more premature death and disease, and more days when people have to miss work or school because they are too sick to go,” says Earthjustice attorney James Pew.

Cement plants are the second largest contributor of mercury emissions in the US. They also release other toxins including but not limited to; dioxins, ammonia, benzene, certain glycol ethers, chromium, diethanolamine, dioxin and dioxin-like compounds, ethylene glycol, lead, manganese, sulfuric acid, and zinc compounds.

The House is expected to vote on another similar bill (EPA Regulatory Relief Act of 2011, H.R. 2250) soon. H.R. 2250 makes industrial boilers and incinerators exempt from the Clean Air Act. Earthjustice states these bills together will cause between 3,400 and 9,000 preventable deaths every year from respiratory disease alone. It will also lead to higher emissions of several pollutants that have been shown to cause cancer, developmental issues in children and birth defects.

“If the bills we consider today are enacted, there will be more cases of cancer, birth defects, and brain damage. The ability of our children to think and learn will be impaired because of their exposure to mercury and other dangerous air pollutants,” said Rep. Henry Waxman on the House floor.

These bills are a direct threat to our health and the health of the environment. Please contact your senator today and tell them to vote no on Cement Sector Regulatory Relief Act of 2011 and EPA Regulatory Relief Act of 2011 and to support clean air.

 


About the Author


Lisa Sharp is passionate about green living, organic food, animals, and natural medicine. She is an environmental activist, green living expert, and consultant. In addition to being the founder and editor of Green Oklahoma, Lisa has a green living blog, Retro Housewife Goes Green. You can follow Lisa on twitter @Retrohousewife5 and Facebook.


 

Photo Credit: abarndweller

 

Toxic Purses

We are aware of the dangers of lead in paint, but did you know that the dangers of lead do not just stop there? Now they are finding traces of lead in purses, handbags and wallets!

This was a big shocker for me. One of the big reasons it was such so shocking is that ever since my teen years I had a purse collection like many women. My closest was filled with all kinds of purses; sparkles, shiny, faux leather, canvas and pretty much any kind you can think of. Naturally, after I heard about lead purses I was concerned.

The Center for Environmental Health pulled purses from over 100 retailers to test for lead. They pulled from all different retailers, including Target and Wal-Mart, a place many of us shop for the affordability. The results were scary. They found that some purses had 30 to 100 times more lead than what is allowed for all children’s items.


The purses that held the most concern were faux leather purses. The lead is used to bring shine and make the color last and unfortunately these are the purses that seem to always be in style. The big thing to realize with these purses is not simply that they contain lead, it’s that the lead rubs off onto our hands, clothes, and items inside. This means that we are likely ingesting lead periodically during the day.

So the question is whether or not a cheap handbag is truly worth the cost it has on our bodies. I have cleaned my closet out, I will not carry a purse that poses a risk. Now it’s time for all of us to not only get rid of these toxic handbags, but to also tell others. There are many women walking the streets with one of these handbags on their shoulders and they have no idea. If you are concerned whether your purse contains lead the Center for Environmental Health offers free lead testing.

*Editor’s note: The faux leather is almost always made from PVC. Almost all PVC contains lead to stabilize it. To avoid lead look for purses that are PVC-free. You can buy real leather but there are concerns about other heavy metals in leather due to the tanning process and some also have ethical reasons for not buying leather. We recommend looking at Etsy.com for a handmade purse made from fabric. *


About the Author

 

Deanna Layman is a stay at home mom, blogger and passionate about “going green.” After the birth of her son she realized just how much we are exposed to chemicals. She decided to begin her journey of going green. She is passionate about it and love to share all the new adventures she is experiencing. She also started a site for moms, Raisinginspiration.com, a place for moms to go and be encouraged, inspired and to create community.

 
Photo credits: Clean Wal-Mart